Travel--Library Picks

Jackson District Library

Library PicksFor July 8, 2007

By Gretchen Dula 

Travel is very popular in the summer and traveling around Michigan is both fun and educational.  Michigan’s own Sleeping Bear Press has published a number of books for kids about our great state, starting with an alphabet book. M is for Mitten by Annie Appleford is a great way for kids to discover our state and its history.  From the Detroit Zoo to the Upper Peninsula there’s a lot to discover and it’s all here.

 

Trinka Hakes Noble places her The Legend of Michigan at the crossroads of two ancient trails – the Old Sauk Trail (now US-12) and the Old Maumee Trail.  Long ago Michigan was covered by a glacier created by the North Wind. An old man came from the East and a young boy the South to plead with the cruel North Wind to release his hold on Michigan.  They wished for all to be able to enjoy the beauty and riches of the land.  Read this great book to find out what the North Wind does.

 

Sleeping Bear Dunes is a great place to visit and before you go, be sure to read The Legend of the Sleeping Bear by Kathy-jo Wargin.  Learn about Mother Bear and her two bear cubs who swam across Lake Michigan because of a fire.  Mother Bear made it across, but did her two cubs?  Read this enchanting Legend to find out.

 

North of Sleeping Bear Dunes, near the Straits of Mackinac is Mill Creek.  During the Amercian Revolution the Campbell family lived there, awaiting permission to build a sawmill.  The rest of the population had relocated to Mackinac Island but the Campbells didn’t wish to move.  Learn how they made A Place Called Home in Janie Lynn Panagopoulos’ book.

 

Up at Whiteship Point, there is The Great Lakes Shipwreck Museum with a display about the Edmund Fitzgerald.  In 1975, the ore carrier Edmund Fitzgerald left Superior, Wisconsin to travel across Lake Superior and through the Straits of Mackinac to Zug Island, Detroit, Michigan with a load of iron ore.  Kathy-jo Wargin depicts the transport ships final hours in The Edmund Fitzgerald: The Song of the Bell.  A storm in November caught the ship in the middle of Lake Superior.  Captain McSorley struggled to get his ship to Whitefish Bay where it would be safe but he lost both his radar and radio signal.  The storm grew to fierce, however and the great ship sank beneath the waves.

After reading about the ship in Ms. Wargin’s book, check out Gordon Lightfoot’s balled, The Wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald, on his Complete Greatest Hits CD to hear his song of the ship. 

Enjoy these great books this summer as you travel around Michigan and we’ll see you at the library.